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Walter Blakenship talks Kensington Stables on BPR!

Brooklyn Paper
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Brooklyn Paper Radio

Hold onto your horses!

That’s what Walter Blankenship, who runs the Kensington Stables in Windsor Terrace, told hosts Gersh Kuntzman and Vince DiMiceli he wants to do now that a judge has ordered him to pay debts his deceased dad racked up on the beloved Greater Park Slope Area horse home.

But the only way to keep the 32 steeds aged 10 to 30 in their home would be to sell the now-bankrupt stable to a savior who would then fix the place up and continue to offer rides for a price.

“I’m not going to let something bad happen to them,” Blakenship said.

Blakenship admitted that the city could be one of the suitors and pointed out that he would love to be the person who would run the facility once if and when the Parks Department takes it over.

“Our goal has been to get an offer to keep it as a stable,” he said. “The city’s offer is not out of the realm of possibility.”

Ever the stickler, Kuntzman wondered if anyone considering taking over the stables would have the means to fix the old place up, and threw in his recommendation for who could get the job done.

“We need to have an Amish barn raising,” Kuntzman said. “Let’s get some Amish people in there and fix that barn.”

DiMiceli concurred.

“Those guys are good,” he said.

In a new feature on the show, Kuntzman and DiMiceli did a “Live Edit” of a story written by one of their reporters, in this case, Caroline Spivack’s piece on Sunset Park’s reaction to a planned bike lane on Fourth Avenue. We add a link to that story when DiMiceli gets around to editing it.

The boys also called out to Stephen Rex Brown of the Daily News to wish him a happy birthday, but Brown did not (or refused to) answer the phone. So they just sang “Happy Birthday” to his voice mail. You’re welcome.

Finally, Brooklyn author David Shenk, apparently speaking from an airport or other place where planes fly low, tried to explain how he was about to achieve his lifelong dream of owning both a smoker and a barbecue grill for his home in Cape Cod or the Berkshires or wherever people of his ilk “summer.”

Yes, it was another jam-packed edition of Brooklyn Paper Radio, so take a listen and enjoy!

Brooklyn Paper radio is recorded and podcast live every Tuesday at 10 am — for your convenience — from our studio in America’s Downtown and can be found, as always, right here on BrooklynPaper.com, on iTunes, on Mixlr, and of course, on Stitcher.

Updated 4:09 pm, May 16, 2017
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