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Saturday, March 5, 2005

NEW CLASSICS

Far from being museum pieces that are only performed exactly as written, many classical works come in different versions, whether sanctioned (or even rearranged) by the composer himself or reconstructed by someone else. Comment.

SEA CHANGE

Like marriage, restaurants begin with the best intentions. And, like a union doomed from the beginning, they’ll close - sometimes months later - with the owners saying, "Why didn’t we see the problems from the start?" Comment.

To the Editor

Letters: I enjoyed reading the article “Underdog is here,” by Karen Butler [GO Brooklyn, Feb. 19]. It is sad indeed that Paul Giamatti was left off the ballot for a Best Actor Oscar for his role in the comedy film “Sideways.” Comment.

BODY OF WORK

When a desperate mother brought her eczema-ridden infant into Karen’s Body Beautiful, a natural body-care products store in Clinton Hill, owner Karen Tappin Saunderson knew just what to do. Comments (1).

’MOON’ SHOT

Laurie Anderson has been called a visual artist, composer, poet, photographer, filmmaker, electronics wiz, vocalist and instrumentalist. But she’s really best described as a metaphysical reporter. Comment.

DUMBO RECIPE SWAP

In the old days, neighbors wouldn’t think twice about borrowing cups of flour from one another in a pinch or sharing casserole recipes. To bring back a taste of that culinary camaraderie, the DUMBO Neighborhood Association (DNA) is launching an effort to collect local recipes. Comment.

TWO PREMIERES

Ballet aficionados have something to look forward to on March 6, when Colorado Ballet returns to the Brooklyn Center for the Performing Arts for the third time. Comment.

DEAR DIARY

Fifteen years ago, Ellen Cassedy inherited an old bureau from her aunt, Jessie Sylvester. In that bureau she found a diary that inspired her to write a play, "Beautiful Hills of Brooklyn," which will be featured at the March 5 First Saturday event at the Brooklyn Museum. Comment.

BUDDING ROMANCE

The set of engravings of plants in the Brooklyn Botanic Garden’s new exhibit, "Banks Florilegium: An Eighteenth-Century Botanical Art Treasure Rediscovered," is of interest to everyone from scientists, to lovers of botanical art to those who love a good old-fashioned story of adventure on the high seas. Comment.

TAKE IT SLOW

There’s nothing more satisfying on a cold night than sitting beside a fireplace, listening to the logs crackle and watching the embers fly. Add a dinner made with organic ingredients and cooked slowly, and you have one blissful evening. Such an experience is the aim of David and Laura Shea, whose restaurant Applewood opened in Park Slope in September. Comment.

Arena foes stuck in Olympic spin cycle       

Atlantic Yards: As members of the International Olympic Committee toured the five boroughs last Tuesday, organizers from Develop-Don’t Destroy Brooklyn split into factions over whether to step inside the Olympic rings or worry about what’s happening on their home court. Comment.

Community weighs in on Gowanus Village       

Community members had the first public opportunity this week to speak with planners of a pioneering residential complex that promises to bring 400 units of mixed-income housing to the banks of the Gowanus Canal. Comment.

Bridge Park Rec Center is kaput       

Dismayed that new plans for Brooklyn Bridge Park omit a Chelsea Piers-like recreational facility but add luxury housing, community members have complained the park lacks enough active amenities for its neighbors. Comment.

MTA on Nets site: ‘Bid Away’      

Atlantic Yards: Responding to calls by elected officials and activists that the Metropolitan Transportation Authority open up the sale of development rights over rail yards at Atlantic and Flatbush avenues to competitive bidding, as the agency has done with the Hudson Yards in Manhattan, an agency spokesman reiterated what he told The Brooklyn Papers last month — they already are. Comment.

Sky-high landmark district

With the help of a preservation group, the Brooklyn Heights Association is promoting a plan to preserve several high-rise office buildings just outside the Brooklyn Heights Historic District. Comment.

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