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Monday, Feb. 10, 2003

FOOD = LOVE

Cupid’s arrow points to these prix fixe menus for a sensuous Valentine’s Day

"Tell me about your first date with dad," my daughter asked recently. . Comment.

TRUE LABOR OF LOVE

Mark and Sarah VanDerBeets have known each other ever since they met in junior college more than 10 years ago. Since that time, they’ve married, moved from California to Williamsburg and are expecting their first child in March. But one thing has stayed the same - their desire to start a theater together. Comment.

RATED G

Tonya Lewis Lee will read from and sign copies of her new children’s book "Please Baby Please" (Simon and Schuster, $16.95) on Feb. 8 at noon at Brownstone Books (409 Lewis Ave. between MacDonough and Decatur streets in Bedford-Stuyvesant). Lee co-authored the book with her husband, filmmaker Spike Lee, about the surprises that came with raising their own toddlers. Comment.

TASTY LOVE

Romantic R&B crooner Freddie Jackson ("Tasty Love," "You are My Lady," "Rock Me Tonight") will perform a special Valentine’s concert on Feb. 15 at 8 pm at Brooklyn Center for the Performing Arts at Brooklyn College, on Campus Road, one block from the junction of Flatbush and Nostrand avenues. Jackson will be joined by special guest Oleta Adams ("Get Here"), who has sung with many artists, including Tears for Fears. Tickets are $35 and $40. To order, call (718) 951-4500. Comment.

WATER LOVERS

Dating in Brooklyn is too often a neurotic dodge ball game of personal ads, bar hopping, e-mail and phone tag whose inscrutable, often fruitless rules seem a universe apart from the natural instincts and pragmatic sense of our fellow beings. Comment.

MOSTLY MOZART

The Amelia Piano Trio will span the last 200 years of music in its recital Sunday, part of the Brooklyn Friends of Chamber Music’s 2002-2003 season. But according to violinist Anthea Kreston, that wasn’t the way the ensemble, which also includes cellist Jason Duckles and pianist Jonathan Yates, planned it. Comment.

STILL HUNGRY

Speaking with restaurateur Alan Harding about his new ventures is like taking the pulse of the changing neighborhoods he serves, and the economy that drives those changes. In an interview with GO Brooklyn, he illustrated the mix of chef, entrepreneur, style-maker and family man that makes up his personality. Comments (4).

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